1 Oct 2016 – 29 Oct 2016

PNI, London

Georgie Nettell

Current Affairs

Installation view, Current Affairs

Installation view, Current Affairs

Installation view, Current Affairs

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London E20 2ST
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Balfron Tower, Poplar, E15
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, NW5 3PT
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Foxtons 506-508 Brixton Rd, Brixton SW9 8EN
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Byron, 114 High Holborn, WC1V 6JQ
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Boris Johnson’s House, 20 Colebrooke Row, Islington, N1 8AP
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Penarth Centre, Penarth St, SE15 1TR
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Cereal Killer Cafe, 139 Brick Lane, E1 6SB|
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Frank's Campari Bar, Peckham Multi Story Carpark, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST
2016
C-Print on Foamex
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Sentiment Analysis (Byron Burger)
2016
C-Print in Artist Frame
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
45 × 78 cm (17 3/4" × 30 3/4") (framed)
Edition of 1 plus I AP

Sentiment Analysis (Cereal Killer Cafe)
2016
C-Print in Artist Frame
42 × 75 cm (16 1/2" × 29 1/2")
45 × 78 cm (17 3/4" × 30 3/4") (framed)
Edition of 1 plus I AP

The News never ceases. Metropolitan liberals struggle to understand the current moment as perceptions of it are relentlessly restructured. At the same time viral shitstorms and the opinions of friends narrate and influence the everyday choices available to those competing within London’s golden bubble.

Even as national and world events unravel artists seem to speak best about their own experiences and Londoners speak best about London. Shot phone to screen, these images provide a snapshot of Life in the Capital as lived by a certain demographic. For those who know the backstory the places pictured function as logos for the conversations and ethical issues that swarm around them.

PRESS / REVIEWS

12 Dec 2016

GNE :: Buzz Killers

In the City of London’s beating heart, a room in a former office building on Holborn Viaduct becomes the previously Mayfair-based commercial gallery space Project Native Informant’s new home. Current Affairs, Georgie Nettell’s third exhibition at the gallery, which ran from September 29 to October 29, displayed a series of foam-mounted and framed photographs. The images referred to recent moments in the English capital; topical subjects that ranged from post-Brexit politics to the tales of London’s gentrifying business-folk. They were social-networked in-jokes to some, seemingly neutralised cosmopolitan images to others. The exclusivity of the (assumed) specific gallery community that Nettell’s work is displayed to is codified into the compositions subjects, as a sub-community with a stake in the mechanism of the creative gentrifiers, establishments and political affairs referenced.

The works, as described in the press release, were photographs shot ‘phone-to-screen.’ A row of well-kept London terraces is the home of new UK Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, a key figure behind the recent Brexit campaign for Britain to leave the European Union. An interior from Brick Lane’s Cereal Killer Cafe, selling imported cereals with a price tag of £3.50 a bowl, was subject to attacks by anti-gentrification protesters and interrogating reporters on live TV. Current Affairs trips itself out as a quasi-urban-renewal Community Centre for the creative industry worker who priced themselves out of an area.

The gallery itself feels aesthetically rough around the edges, like an artist-led project space or live/work studio. The interior and images infect one another’s registers against a view of the city from the gallery’s third floor windows. IKEA desks and a bookshelf are used to delineate gallery from office. The room is lit with fluorescent tubes in recessed ceiling tiles that may have been upgraded daylight bulbs. The interior feels fashionable in its arbitrary features. As a cafe-bar might leave a section of unpainted drywall or exposed brick, the ex-city-centre office bares an environment fitting for Nettell’s show and her subjects. The Current Affairs press release refers to the function of these images as logos for a creative-cultural demographic and the ethical issues around them. Eating a gourmet burger at a chain that conspires with the police to trick and arrest suspected undocumented workers, and smashing up a Foxtons estate agents are both experiences rife with questions of privilege, access and community. These images, in their simplification as signs, critique the viewer demographic and their brand of judgement but do so from within the safe space of a young, successful, commercial gallery where these critiques are the artist’s content and commodity.

Mitch "value added: an artist considers art’s role in the property market" AQNB 12 December 2016